Defining Unattended Deaths

What is the definition of an unattended death? An unattended death occurs when a person dies and their body is not found for days, weeks, or even longer. Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. Dealing with the unattended death of a loved one only adds to this challenge.

How to Handle an Unattended Death

Once the body is found, the authorities should be contacted. Once the authorities are contacted, the medical examiner or coroner will be called to the scene to evaluate possible cause of death. If the medical examiner determines it to be a natural death, the body will then be released to the family. If the medical examiner suspects foul play or suicide, however, an autopsy will most likely be required.

Once the medical examiner, police officers, and investigators finish processing the scene, cleanup of the site can begin.

Cleaning the Scene - Don’t Do it Alone

Cleaning the site of an unattended death is one of the most challenging cleanup situations one can face. As the body decomposes, it releases body fluids and potentially harmful bacteria that can make you sick and negatively impact the home or environment. Because of this, you should not attempt to clean an unattended death site without the help of a professional bioremediation company.

What does a bioremediation company do?

A bioremediation company (also referred to as a crime scene cleanup or trauma cleanup company) clean, sanitize, and deodorize homes and properties that have been affected by violent crimes, suicides, and contamination. To prevent the spread of diseases and bacteria, bioremediation specialists wear personal protective equipment (PPE), follow approved safety and sanitation procedures, and use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) fluorescence testing to ensure a site is sanitized to hospital-grade sanitization levels.

Aftermath provides unattended death cleanup services to families and property managers across the country. Our expert technicians are available to help you 24/7 - call us today.

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Sources:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/hb_me.pdf
http://www.aftermath.com/contact-24-7-365/

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